Orion Night

Would I find a star at the same position at the same time of day next year ?

Let's say I located a star at 10 PM on the 1st of January 2010, Would I find it in the same place next year 2011 at 10 PM on the 1st of January. Given that both years have a 28 days February.
Let's say I located a star at 10 PM on the 1st of January 2010, Would I find it in the same place next year 2011 at 10 PM on the 1st of January. Given that both years have a 28 days February.

Thanks you for answers I don't know how to discuss this with you I can't find a way to post what I want to say, But what I mean is would I'd be able, in real life to recognize the star because it will be, to me, at the same place of last year. I didn't mean it in an astronomical calculated way. By Eye-sight, Would I be able to recognize it ?

By eye it would be in exactly the same position. That's how years were kept long ago, seeing what stars were where. When Sirius rose just before the Sun the Nile floods were due so it was planting time. It helped the old Egyptians for hundreds of years, rising the same every year, year in year out. That was the planting calender keeper that star was. Handy one to have around. All you had to do was to be up in the morning before the Sun came up and look at the sky.
The day you saw that bright point of light in the right place and new it was Sirius...Sopdet to them... you told the boss and the boss said....planting time, get to work.
But they had a festival first....fertility time...happy again.
The technical name for it when you see a star rising just before the Sun is the heliacal rising of the star....from the old Greek name for the Sun which was Helios.
Have a look down here to the the paragraph starting ..."There is another astronomical event...." It's all about it and a nice little read.
http://phoenixqi.blogspot.com/2007/03/how-long-does-phoenix-live.html . . . . . .

The stars do vary a tiny bit but you need very accurate instruments to measure the change year by year. It's less than a second of time difference in a year and to measure it you have to have an instrument that points that accurately. No good measuring to a second of time if your telescope is pointing the wrong way by 15 seconds of arc or you'll get a wrong result anyway.
The Earth turns 15 degrees an hour, that's 15 seconds of arc in one second of time. The resolution of the eye is around 2 minutes of arc.....so the pointing accuracy has to be at least sixteen times better than the eye can see just to get a time to the nearest second (you can be out of true either side of the proper line remember if you're working that one out) and for a result that's really worth anything you need thirty times better at least.
It takes 25800 years for the Earth's biggest wobble to complete one turn. In one year that's a 25800th of the sky, or 5.02 seconds of arc and it takes one third of a second of time for the Earth to turn that much in it's daily rotation. One second in three years or one minute of time in 180 years.....about 24 seconds difference in an average lifetime for when a star rises or is due south or sets or is in the same position anywhere in the sky on the same day of the year.
A star rises 4 minutes earlier each might. That's 2 hours a month earlier or 24 hours in a year. The day we normally keep, of 24 hours is actually a bit longer than a sidereal day. That one is 23 hours and 56 minutes, hence the 4 minutes difference every day in when the stars rise.
In the autumn every year in the northern hemisphere Orion rises. Like an old friend coming back year after year. By mid winter it's a lovely sight....hahaaaay Orion nights again.......
Every year without fail. Same with all the other stars.
Here's a star clock you can make using the Plough, or the Big Dipper if you're on the western side of the pond. It works because the stars do exactly the same every year, within our normal vision anyway.

http://www.skyandtelescope.com/letsgo/familyfun/Make_a_Star_Clock.html

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